In need of a black man

Added: Montrell Tilley - Date: 11.02.2022 19:34 - Views: 15430 - Clicks: 8014

In the U. Black patients in particular have among the worst health outcomes, and black men have the lowest life expectancy of any demographic group. A of factors contribute to these health disparities, but one problem has been a lack of diversity among physicians. A new NBER study looks at how changing this ratio might improve health outcomes.

In need of a black man

They found that black men seen by black doctors agreed to more, and more invasive, preventive services than those seen by nonblack doctors. And this effect seemed to be driven by better communication and more trust. Black patients in particular have among the worst health outcomes, experiencing higher rates of hypertension and stroke. And black men have the lowest life expectancy of any demographic group, living on average 4. Of active U. Research has found that physicians of color are more likely to treat minority patients and practice in underserved communities.

A new NBER study looks at how changing this ratio might improve health outcomes — and save lives. Increasing demand for preventive care could go a long way toward improving health. A substantial part of the difference in life expectancy between white and black men is due to chronic diseases that are amenable to prevention. The researchers — Drs. Graziani of the University of California, Berkeley — wanted to conduct a community-based study, so they recruited black men from 20 barbershops and two flea markets in Oakland, California.

In need of a black man

Garrick told me. They were able to enroll more than 1, black men to participate. Then they received a coupon for a free health screening for blood pressure, BMI, cholesterol, and diabetes at a clinic. About half of the participants showed up to the clinic for a screening.

In need of a black man

Those who did tended to be older, have In need of a black man self-reported income and health, be unemployed, have less education, and not have a primary care doctor. Once participants got to the clinic and to their private patient room, they were given a tablet showing a photo of their randomly ased doctor, his name, and a list of the services they could select.

They saw that two of these screenings, for diabetes and cholesterol, required a finger prick of blood. Participants then talked to their doctor. Doctors were only allowed to provide these five preventive services — all highly recommended, cost-effective interventions — and were told to encourage patients to agree to all of them. During the consultation, patients could revise their selections and have the services done. After the visit, patients filled out a feedback form. Then researchers compared the services provided with the services the men chose before talking to the doctor.

The were fascinating. In the first stage, before meeting their doctor, participants selected the same of preventive services, regardless of whether the doctor they saw on the tablet was black. Alsan said. But in the second stage, after talking to their doctor, men who met with black doctors elected to receive more preventive services — especially more invasive services that required a blood sample or injection — than men who met with nonblack doctors. This held even controlling for duration of the visit and physician characteristics.

For example, participants ased to black doctors were more likely to have their blood pressure and BMI measured than those who saw nonblack doctors. And for invasive tests, only men who saw a black doctor agreed to take up more services than they had initially selected. The researchers also found that the effects were most pronounced for men with greater mistrust of the medical system.

They were the most reluctant to have services done in the beginning, and they were the most likely to change their minds after talking to a black doctor and to have more services done.

In need of a black man

This is meaningful, as other research has found that black men are more likely to distrust the U. Why would black men choose more services after seeing a black doctor? Looking at doctor notes, patient feedback, and data from a separate survey, the researchers point to a few pieces of evidence suggesting that better trust and communication between black doctors and black patients was what made the difference.

First, because the study was focused on offering preventive care, as opposed to curative care treating illness, the role of the doctor was mostly limited to explaining the benefits of the preventive services and then providing them. And black doctors also wrote longer notes about their patients than nonblack doctors. Second, the researchers gathered additional data by surveying a similar sample of 1, black and white men on doctor preferences.

In need of a black man

Both white and black men thought that doctors of their race were about as qualified as other doctors. Which doctor would understand you the best? Of course, the precise mechanisms here are difficult to pin down, and the researchers acknowledge that other factors besides communication and trust could be at play.

Perhaps black doctors were somehow better-quality, or maybe discrimination played a role. This study supports the push to increase diversity in the health care workforce. Many racial and ethnic minority patients seek out doctors of the same background — but access is an issue. The survey found that white men were 20 percentage points more likely than black men to say they could access a doctor of their race.

But the researchers and others advise against interpreting these to mean that black patients should be treated by black doctors preferentially. Garrick said. Jena noted that what he liked most about the study was that it was so ambitious — it randomized across a large of patients and set up a separate clinic. But black men are less likely to seek routine and preventative care than other groups, and increasing their uptake could yield ificant health benefits. You have 1 free article s left this month.

In need of a black man

You are reading your last free article for this month. Subscribe for unlimited access. Nicole Torres is a former senior editor at Harvard Business Review. Partner Center.

In need of a black man

email: [email protected] - phone:(433) 833-1118 x 7525

Black Men Who Have Sex With Men and the Association of Down-Low Identity With HIV Risk Behavior